The Most Peculiar Filipino Dishes


Credits: www.bizarrefood.com
Credits: www.bizarrefood.com

Want to taste disturbing-looking food but with the taste of AWESOMENESS? Then hop on to the tasting train, and let me take you to the Filipino's most peculiar dishes. Better to close your eyes while eating, though. 

Isaw

Credits: lifeoutofoffice.com
Credits: lifeoutofoffice.com
"Isaw is a street food from the Philippines, made from barbecued pig or chicken intestines.[1] The intestines are cleaned, turned inside out, and cleaned again, repeating the process several times. They are then either boiled, then grilled, or immediately grilled on sticks. They are usually dipped in suka/sukang pinakurat (Filipino term for vinegar with onions, peppers, and other spices) then eaten. They are usually sold by vendors on the street corners in afternoons."

-Wikipedia

Soup No. 5

Credits: Filipiknow.com
Credits: Filipiknow.com
"If you’re a brave foodie and looking for the next aphrodisiac to try, Soup no. 5 should be a hot pick. But not for those whose stomach turns at the sight of exotic foods. For one, Soup no. 5 is made from a bull’s sex organs—considered by many as the “fifth leg” of the animal, hence the name. Cebuanos know it as “lanciao” and is believed to give the physical attributes of a bull to anyone willing to take a sip."

-Filipiknow.com

Sundot Kulangot

Credits: Filipiknow.com
Credits: Filipiknow.com
"By just its name alone, sundot kulangot can scare away picky eaters. It literally means “poke a snot” or “pick a booger”, describing the bizarre way of eating it. But despite its name, there’s nothing gross about this traditional candy. 

"Packaged within small wooden orbs, sundot kulangot are actually sweet, pinch-sized delicacies that taste like our traditional coconut jams. One must break the orb and use either a popsicle stick or one’s own finger to get a taste of the candy. Thanks to its tedious preparation, sundot kulangot is now becoming a rarity with its limited supply being sold in Baguio City and other Northern Luzon provinces."

-Filipiknow.com

Tamilok

Credits: Filipiknow.com
Credits: Filipiknow.com
"It’s slimy, salty, and nowhere near appetizing. But to make your Palawan adventure memorable, local guides will tell you that tamilok is really worth a try. Tamilok usually bores into wooden structures and mangroves that are abundant in the municipalities of Coron, El Nido, and Linapacan. Eating a tamilok also means munching on pests because these creatures destroys every wood they come across, giving them the name 'termites of the sea'."


-Filipiknow.com

Balut

Credits: www.bizarrefood.com
Credits: www.bizarrefood.com
"How do you like your eggs? Sunny side up, Scrambled…? If you’re from the Philippines you’d probably want your eggs Balut style. 

"Balut is a dish that is common in the Philippines. It is a duck egg that is fertilized and has a partially grown duck embryo inside of it. The egg is then boiled and the embryo and the liquid inside is cooked. Once the dish is served, the shell is punctured and the broth inside is sipped from the shell. Then the shell is peeled so the diner can eat the yolk and the cooked chick. It is common to see vendors selling balut in a bucket filled with sand to keep them warm."

-www.bizarrefood.com